Tina Williams Presents












Studies show that for every hour of walking, you increase your life expectancy by two. That was the best motivation for me. Every extra hour I have on this earth to spend with my husband and son was worth it. That was the extra little push I needed.

It’s Easy

  • Walking is the simplest way to start and continue a fitness journey.
  • Walking costs nothing to get started.
  • Walking has the lowest dropout rate of any type of exercise.
  • Walking is easy and safe.

It Works

  • Studies show that for every hour of walking, life expectancy may increase by two hours.
  • Walking for as few as 30 minutes a day provides heart health benefits.
  • Walking is the single most effective form of exercise to achieve heart health.

It Pays

  • Physically active people save $500 a year in healthcare costs.
  • Employers can save $16 for every $1 they spend on health and wellness.
  • Fitness programs have reduced employer healthcare costs by 20 – 55%.
  • Reducing just one health risk in the workplace increases productivity by 9%.
  • Reducing one health risk decreases absenteeism by 2%.

And walking isn’t your only option. Try these tips for increasing physical activity wherever you are. You may be surprised at all your opportunities to increase your physical activity every day. Consider carrying this list with you for one day. Check off the ways you notice that you could increase your physical activity.

Tips for increasing physical activity

At Home

It’s convenient, comfortable and safe to work out at home. It allows your children to see you being active, which sets a good example for them. You can combine exercise with other activities, such as watching TV. If you buy exercise equipment, it’s a one-time expense and other family members can use it. It’s easy to have short bouts of activity several times a day. Try these tips:

  • Do housework yourself instead of hiring someone else to do it.
  • Work in the garden or mow the grass. Using a riding mower doesn’t count! Rake leaves, prune, dig and pick up trash.
  • Go out for a short walk before breakfast, after dinner or both! Start with 5-10 minutes and work up to 30 minutes.
  • Walk or bike to the corner store instead of driving.
  • When walking, pick up the pace from leisurely to brisk. Choose a hilly route. When watching TV, sit up instead of lying on the sofa. Or stretch. Better yet, spend a few minutes pedaling on your stationary bicycle while watching TV. Throw away your video remote control. Instead of asking someone to bring you a drink, get up off the couch and get it yourself.
  • Stand up while talking on the telephone.
  • Walk the dog.
  • Park farther away at the shopping mall and walk the extra distance. Wear your walking shoes and sneak in an extra lap or two around the mall.
  • Stretch to reach items in high places and squat or bend to look at items at floor level.
  • Keep exercise equipment repaired and use it!

At the Office

Most of us have sedentary jobs, and work takes up a significant part of our day. What can you do to increase your physical activity during the work day? Why not…:

  • Brainstorm project ideas with a coworker while taking a walk.
  • Create an exercise accountability partnership.
  • Walk during business calls when you don’t need to reference important documents.
  • Stand while talking on the telephone.
  • Walk down the hall to speak with someone rather than using the telephone.
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Or get off a few floors early and take the stairs the rest of the way.
  • Walk while waiting for the plane at the airport.
  • Stay at hotels with fitness centers or swimming pools and use them while on business trips.
  • Take along a jump rope or a resistance band in your suitcase when you travel. Jump and do calisthenics in your hotel room.
  • Download some audio fitness coaching.
  • Participate in or start a recreation league at your company.
  • Form a sports team to raise money for charity events.
  • Join a fitness center or YMCA near your job. Work out before or after work to avoid rush-hour traffic, or drop by for a noon workout.
  • Schedule exercise time on your business calendar and treat it as any other important appointment.
  • Get off the bus a few blocks early and walk the rest of the way to work or home.
  • Walk around your building for a break during the work day or during lunch.
  • Some have mastered the art of typing while on a treadmill by securing the laptop to the base. Be creative!

At Play

Play and recreation are important for good health. Look for opportunities such as these to be active and have fun at the same time:
  • Plan family outings and vacations that include physical activity (hiking, backpacking, swimming, etc.)
  • See the sights in new cities by walking, jogging or bicycling.
  • Make a date with a friend to enjoy your favorite physical activities. Do them regularly.
  • Play your favorite music while exercising; enjoy something that motivates you.
  • Dance with someone or by yourself. Take dancing lessons. Hit the dance floor on fast numbers instead of slow ones.
  • Join a recreational club that emphasizes physical activity.
  • At the beach, sit and watch the waves instead of lying flat. Better yet, get up and walk, run or fly a kite.
  • When golfing, walk instead of using a cart.
  • Play singles tennis or racquetball instead of doubles.
  • At a picnic, join in on badminton instead of croquet.
  • At the lake, rent a rowboat instead of a canoe.

(www.heart.org )

Here’s a walking website with lots of fun tools. Oh.. and mark your calendar for April 4th. National Walking Day!!

 

http://www.startwalkingnow.org/

 

 

 

Advertisements


{February 26, 2012}   The dirty statistics. Yikes!

Heart Disease Statistics

  • Every 34 seconds a  person in the United States dies from heart disease.
  • More than 2,500 Americans die from heart disease each day.
  • Every 20 seconds, a person in the United States has a heart attack.
  • At least 250,000 people die of heart attacks each year before they reach a hospital.
  • Studies show that under-educated people are more likely to suffer heart attacks.
  • The countries with the highest death rates from heart disease are the Soviet Union, Romania, Poland, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia. The countries with the lowest are Japan, France, Spain, Switzerland, and Canada.
  • Almost 6 million hospitalizations each year (in the United States) are due to cardiovascular disease.
  • Since 1900, Cardio Vascular Disease has been the number 1 killer in the United States for every year but 1918.
  • Every 33 seconds, a person dies from Cardio Vascular Disease in the United States.
  • Men suffer heart attacks about 10 years earlier in life than women do.


{February 22, 2012}   25 foods good for your heart

25 Top Heart-Healthy Foods

With the help of these nutrition experts from The Cleveland Clinic and the American Dietetic Association, we’ve put together a list of the “best of the best” heart-healthy foods.

The foods listed here are all top-performers in protecting your heart and blood vessels. We’ve also got menu ideas — so you can easily bring heart-healthy foods into your daily breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

  1. Salmon

Omega-3 fatty acids.

Grill salmon with a yummy rub or marinade. Save a chunk to chop for a pasta or salad later on.

  1. Flaxseed (ground)

Omega-3 fatty acids; fiber, phytoestrogens.

Ground flaxseed hides easily in all sorts of foods — yogurt parfaits, morning cereal, homemade muffins, or cookies.

  1. Oatmeal

Omega-3 fatty acids; magnesium; potassium; folate; niacin; calcium; soluble fiber.

Top hot oatmeal with fresh berries. Oatmeal-and-raisin cookies are a hearty treat.

  1. Black or Kidney Beans

B-complex vitamins; niacin; folate; magnesium; omega-3 fatty acids; calcium; soluble fiber.

Give soup or salad a nutrient boost — stir in some beans.

  1. Almonds

Plant omega-3 fatty acids; vitamin E; magnesium; fiber; heart-favorable mono- and polyunsaturated fats; phytosterols.

Mix a few almonds (and berries) into low-fat yogurt, trail mix, or fruit salads.

  1. Walnuts

Plant omega-3 fatty acids; vitamin E; magnesium; folate; fiber; heart-favorable mono- and polyunsaturated fats; phytosterols.

Walnuts add flavorful crunch to salads, pastas, cookies, muffins, even pancakes.

  1. Red wine

Catechins and reservatrol (flavonoids).

Toast your good health! A glass of red wine could improve “good” HDL cholesterol.

  1. Tuna

Omega-3 fatty acids; folate; niacin.

Here’s lunch: Salad greens, fresh fruit, canned tuna. Keep “Salad Spritzer” – a light dressing — in your office fridge.

  1. Tofu

Niacin; folate; calcium; magnesium; potassium.

Tasty tofu is easy: Thinly slice “firm” tofu, marinate several hours, grill or stir-fry.

  1. Brown rice

B-complex vitamins; fiber; niacin; magnesium, fiber.

Microwavable brown rice makes a quick lunch. Stir in a few chopped veggies (broccoli, carrots, spinach).

  1. Soy milk

Isoflavones (a flavonoid); B-complex vitamins; niacin; folate, calcium; magnesium; potassium; phytoestrogens.

Soy milk is great over oatmeal or whole-grain cereal. Or, make a smoothie with soy milk.

  1. Blueberries

Beta-carotene and lutein (carotenoids); anthocyanin (a flavonoid); ellagic acid (a polyphenol); vitamin C; folate; calcium, magnesium; potassium; fiber.

Cranberries, strawberries, raspberries are potent, too — for trail mixes, muffins, salads!

  1. Carrots

Alpha-carotene (a carotenoid); fiber.

Baby carrots are sweet for lunch. Sneak shredded carrots into spaghetti sauce or muffin batter.

  1. Spinach

Lutein (a carotenoid); B-complex vitamins; folate; magnesium; potassium; calcium; fiber.

Pick spinach (not lettuce) for nutrient-packed salads and sandwiches.

  1. Broccoli

Beta-carotene (a carotenoid); Vitamins C and E; potassium; folate; calcium; fiber.

Chop fresh broccoli into store-bought soup. For a veggie dip, try hummus (chickpeas).

  1. Sweet potato

Beta-carotene (a carotenoid); vitamins A, C, E; fiber.

Microwave in a zip-lock baggie for lunch. Eat au naturale, or with pineapple bits.

  1. Red bell peppers

Beta-carotene and lutein (carotenoids); B-complex vitamins; folate; potassium; fiber.

Rub with olive oil, and grill or oven-roast until tender. Delicious in wraps, salads, sandwiches.

  1. Asparagus

Beta-carotene and lutein (carotenoids); B-complex vitamins; folate; fiber.

Grill or steam slightly, then dress with olive oil and lemon. It’s a pretty side dish.

  1. Oranges

Beta-cryptoxanthin, beta- and alpha-carotene, lutein (carotenoids) and flavones (flavonoids); vitamin C; potassium; folate; fiber.

Got orange juice? Check out the new nutrient-packed blends.

  1. Tomatoes

Beta- and alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein (carotenoids); vitamin C; potassium; folate; fiber.

For a flavor twist, try oil-packed tomatoes in sandwiches, salads, pastas, pizzas.

  1. Acorn squash

Beta-carotene and lutein (carotenoids); B-complex and C vitamins; folate; calcium; magnesium; potassium; fiber.

Baked squash is comfort food on a chilly day. Serve with sautéed spinach, pine nuts, raisins.

  1. Cantaloupe

Alpha- and beta-carotene and lutein (carotenoids); B-complex and C vitamins; folate; potassium; fiber.

A fragrant ripe cantaloupe is perfect for breakfast, lunch, potluck dinners. Simply cut and enjoy!

  1. Papaya

Beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein (carotenoids); Vitamins C and E; folate; calcium; magnesium; potassium.

Serve papaya salsa with salmon: Mix papaya, pineapple, scallions, garlic, fresh lime juice, salt and black pepper.

  1. Dark chocolate

Reservatrol and cocoa phenols (flavonoids).

A truffle a day lowers blood pressure, but choose 70% or higher cocoa content.

  1. Tea

Catechins and flavonols (flavonoids).

Make sun tea: Combine a clear glass jar, several tea bags, and hours of sunshine.

 

Phytoestrogensare substances in plants (like flaxseed) that have a weak estrogen-like action in the body. Studies suggest that flaxseed lowers the risk of blood clots, stroke, and cardiac arrhythmias. It may also help lower total and LDL “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides, and even blood pressure.

Phytosterols are plant sterols that chemically resemble cholesterol — and seem to reduce blood cholesterol. All nuts and seeds, including wheat germ, have phytosterols.

Carotenoids are heart-protective antioxidants in many colorful fruits and veggies. Alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, and lycopene are carotenoids.

Polyphenols are another set of antioxidants that protect blood vessels, lower blood pressure, reduce LDL “bad” cholesterol. Flavonoid polyphenols include catechins, flavonones, flavonols, isoflavones, reservatrol, and anthocyanins. Non-flavonoid polyphenols include ellagic acid (found in all types of berries).

Omega-3 fatty acids (found in fatty fish like salmon) and alpha-linolenic fatty acids (found in plant foods like walnuts) help boost the immune system, reduce blood clots, and protect against heart attacks. They also increase good HDL levels, lower triglyceride levels, protect arteries from plaque buildup, are anti-inflammatories, and lower blood pressure.

B-complex vitamins — like Vitamin B-12 (folate) and vitamin B-6 — protect against blood clots and atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Niacin (vitamin B-3) helps increase HDL “good” cholesterol.

Vitamins C and E are antioxidants that protect cells from free radical damage. Magnesium, potassium, and calcium help lower blood pressure. Fiber-rich foods help lower cholesterol levels.



{February 22, 2012}   Heart Health Giveaway

GIVEAWAY TIME!

Who doesn’t love giveaways?

Want to win a bottle of MonaVie Pulse?

DRINK TO YOUR HEART’S CONTENT

MonaVie Pulse®is a heart healthy blend of 19 fruits, resveratrol, and plant sterols,* which have been clinically shown to help lower cholesterol. Featuring AçaVie—the purest, most potent form of açai available—this cardioprotective juice supports optimal cell health and healthy cholesterol levels. Do something good for your heart and enjoy MonaVie Pulse today.

Now fortified with more superfruits, beneficial fiber, and key vitamins A, C, and E, MonaVie Pulse features a heart healthy blend of fruits specifically chosen for their ability to nutritionally support cardiovascular health.

Açai, grape, pineapple, apple, pomegranate, prickly pear, elderberry, yumberry, bilberry, blueberry, cherry, maqui, cranberry, strawberry, aronia, acerola, cupuaçu, jabuticaba, camu camu.

 

* Foods containing at least 0.4 grams per serving of plant sterols, eaten twice a day with meals for a daily total intake of at least 0.8 grams and as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease. Two servings (4 ounces) of MonaVie Pulse contain 0.8 grams of plant sterols.

Key Benefits

  • Naturally lowers cholesterol.*
  • Boasts healthy levels of plant sterols to protect your heart and cardiovascular system.
  • Features resveratrol, which helps protect healthy blood vessels.
  • Fights oxidative damage and aging.
  • Features a wide array of essential nutrients for optimal health.
  • Delivers the antioxidant capacity of approximately 13 servings of common fruits and vegetables in just four ounces.

* Foods containing at least 0.4 grams per serving of plant sterols, eaten twice a day with meals for a daily total intake of at least 0.8 grams and as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease. Two servings (4 ounces) of MonaVie Pulse contain 0.8 grams of plant sterols.

Essential Facts

  • Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.
  • Maintaining healthy cholesterol levels is a primary line of defense against heart disease.
  • Features an intermediate score of 57 on the Glycemic Index (GI), which measures how the foods you eat impact your blood sugar levels.
  • AçaVie™ is an antioxidant packed ingredient that combines our patented açai and juçara freeze-dried powder and puree with Enlivenox, a proprietary açai compound boasting 10 times more polyphenols than traditional açai.

 

MonaVie Pulse and Plant Sterols

*Foods containing at least 0.4 grams per serving of plant sterols taken twice a day with meals for a total daily intake of 0.8 grams, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease. Two servings (four ounces) of MonaVie Pulse contain 0.8 grams of plant sterols.

 

 

 

 



{February 22, 2012}   sodium

I’ll start with the basic stuff. All this info is from the CDC’s site so it’s not really major research here. But, we have plenty of time to get into some of the quirky info and controversial topics over the next month. We’ll start simple.

Key Messages

  • About 90% of Americans aged 2 years and older eat too much sodium.
  • Reducing the sodium Americans eat by 1200 mg per day on average could save $20 billion a year in medical costs.
  • Most of the sodium we eat comes from processed foods and foods prepared in restaurants.
  • 44% of the sodium we eat comes from 10 types of foods.
  • Different brands of the same foods may have different sodium levels. For example, sodium in chicken noodle soup can vary by as much as 840 milligrams (mg) per serving so be sure to read the labels on foods.
  • Over 800,000 people die each year from heart disease, stroke and other vascular diseases, costing the nation $273 billion health care dollars in 2010.

Vital Signs: Where’s the sodium?
There’s too much sodium in many common foods.

A woman reading the nutrition label of a prepared food item.The CDC Vital Signs program is a call to action each month concerning a single, important public health topic. For American Heart Month, the February edition of CDC Vital Signs focuses on the amount of sodium in Americans’ diets and what we can do to reduce it.

About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet.

Too much sodium increases a person’s risk for high blood pressure. High blood pressure often leads to heart disease, stroke, and other vascular diseases.



et cetera